Trauma gel

Constantly experimenting with natural materials in the lab as a young adult, Joe Landolina conceived an adhesive hemostatic gel composed of plant-based polymers that could support the natural clotting process. To refine and manufacture the gel technology he invented, Joe, with his partner, Isaac Miller, founded Brooklyn-based medical device company, Cresilon (formerly Suneris). As partners, they recognized that stopping a bleed effectively remained a critical need in the medical field. Based on Joe’s invention, our proprietary product VETIGEL™ was developed out of the need for a faster, more reliable solution in hemostasis for veterinarians performing both routine treatments and complex operations every day. As we continue to investigate applications for our principle gel technology, our team is connected by one shared mission—to improve wound care and advance the standard of medical treatment. Visit their website...

Paraplegics are learning to walk again with virtual reality

The chances of recovery for paraplegic patients were once considered nearly nil. But in 2014, 29-year-old Juliano Pinto, who faced complete paralysis below the chest, literally kicked off the opening match at the FIFA World Cup. Researchers had created a brain-machine interface (BMI) that allowed Pinto to control a robotic exoskeleton for the symbolic kickoff at São Paulo’s Corinthians Arena. Fast forward two years, the Walk Again Project (WAP), the same nonprofit international research consortium that designed Pinto’s exoskeleton, is now using virtual reality to help paraplegic people regain partial sensation and muscle control in their lower limbs. According to a study published Aug. 11 in Scientific Reports, all eight patients who participated in the study have already gained some motor control. “When we look at the brains of these patients when they got to us, we couldn’t detect any signal when we asked them to imagine walking again. There was no modulation of brain activity,” Dr. Miguel Nicolelis, the lead researcher from Duke University in North Carolina, said in a Scientific Reports call on Aug. 9. “It’s almost like the brain had erased the concept of moving by walking.” See full article and video...