Professor Vivienne Russell

Professor Vivienne Russell

Prof. Russell is in the department of human Biology at the university of cape town, and is also a fractional professor in the School of laboratory medicine and medical Science at the college of health Sciences, university of Kwazulu-natal. her research field is neuroscience in which she focuses on animal models of brain disorders. projects include studies of attention- deficit/hyperactivity disorder (adhd), parkinson’s disease and the effect of stress and exercise on the brain. in more recent years, she focused on the problem of neuroenergetics and the consequences in terms of brain disorders when the energy supply to functioning neuronal networks is compromised. Prof Russell is internationally recognised for her research contributions; with over 140 peer- reviewed journal publications, 8 chapters in books, extensive international research collaborations and has presented at countless local and international conference proceedings. She is also the currently chair of the Scientific committee of the international Brain research organization (iBro) african center for advanced training in neuroscience at the university of cape town. when asked what her motivation for choosing neuroscience as her field of research was, she eloquently articulated: “I was motivated by a desire to understand why humans do what we do. The brain with its connections to nearly every part of the body is remarkable and presents an unequalled challenge with the promise to significantly enhance our understanding of life.” her success, she says has always been based on team effort, and even more she says that her success is foremost shared with her students and her collaborators across the globe. She believes that her achievements would not have been possible without...
Duncan Mitchell

Duncan Mitchell

Born in Germiston, Duncan Mitchell now is Emeritus Professor of Physiology at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, and Honorary Professorial Research Fellow in its Brain Function Research Group, from the directorship of which he retired in 2006.  Before joining the University in 1975, he was on the scientific staff of the National Institute for Medical Research, London, England, and of the Research Organization of the Chamber of Mines of South Africa.  His research started in the field of applied human physiology of deep-level mining, and he has added research in neurophysiology, fever physiology, and ecophysiology to a lifelong career in thermal physiology.  His interest in neurophysiology has led to a parallel research programme in pain pathophysiology and pharmacology.  With his colleagues and students at the University of the Witwatersrand and the University of Western Australia and Lethbridge University, Canada, he currently is pursuing research in conservation physiology related to climate change, in the pathophysiology of pain resulting from HIV and its treatment, and in sickness behaviour.  He regards the award to him of the Harry Oppenheimer Fellowship for 2010 as the pinnacle of his research career....